https://www.dental-research.com/idr/issue/feed International Dental Research 2023-10-15T00:00:00+00:00 Prof. Dr. Ozkan ADIGUZEL info@dental-research.com Open Journal Systems <p align="justify"><em>International Dental Research </em>is a multidisciplinary&nbsp;double-blind peer-reviewed dental journal publishing articles in the field of dentistry. The <em>International Dental Research</em> is the official tri-annually publication (April, August, December).&nbsp;</p> <p align="justify">The <em>&nbsp;International Dental Research</em> publishes scientific articles, case reports and comparison studies evaluating materials and methods of dental treatment. Dentists can learn about new concepts in dental treatment and the latest advances in techniques and instrumentation in the one journal that helps them keep pace with rapid changes in this field. The journal also aims to provide clinicians, scientists and students of dentistry with a knowledge transfer platform for rapid publication of reports through an international journal, which will be available free online. The broad coverage of current research has given the journal an international reputation as an indispensable source for both basic scientists and clinicians engaged in understanding and preventing dental disease. All articles will be critically reviewed by the editor and invited referees within 2 months. No fees are requested from the authors for submission and publication process.</p> https://www.dental-research.com/idr/article/view/473 Evaluation of the buccal bone thickness in the anterior maxillary region using cone-beam computed tomography 2022-12-16T11:59:44+00:00 Ahmet Sağlıklı ahmetsaglikli07@gmail.com Fikret İpek melihsemih21@hotmail.com <p><strong>Aim: </strong>This study aimed to analyze the buccal plate thickness of maxillary anterior teeth using cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) images.</p> <p><strong>Methodology:</strong> This study involved a retrospective analysis of CBCT images from 104 randomly selected patients aged 20–50 years who had not experienced loss of their maxillary central and lateral incisors and canine teeth. The bone thicknesses of six anterior maxillary teeth were measured at 1 mm, 3 mm, and 5 mm distances apical to the alveolar bone crest (ABC) and between the cemento-enamel junction (CEJ) and ABC for six anterior maxillary teeth. The association between buccal bone plate width and distance from the CEJ to the ABC was examined across genders and among different age groups.</p> <p><strong>Results:</strong> The mean buccal bone thicknesses were 1.13 mm, 1.22 mm, and 1.04 mm at distances of 1 mm, 3 mm, and 5 mm, respectively. The mean distance from the CEJ to the ABC was 2.09 mm. A negative correlation was observed between age and the distance from the CEJ to the ABC. No correlation was found between buccal bone thickness and gender, and a negative correlation existed between age and buccal bone thickness. Women displayed a significantly lower distance from the CEJ to the ABC compared to men, and a negative correlation between buccal bone thickness and distance from the CEJ to the ABC was present across all tooth groups.</p> <p><strong>Conclusion:</strong> This study revealed that the bone width in the maxillary anterior region was remarkably thin. Therefore, achieving the minimum bone thickness of 2 mm necessary for optimal aesthetic and functional outcomes is seldom feasible in this area. Considering these findings, additional research utilizing larger patient cohorts is essential to fully comprehend how age and gender affect buccal bone thickness and CEJ-ABC distance. Additionally, utilizing preoperative CBCT for radiographic analysis to identify risk factors and select the appropriate treatment approach is strongly recommended.</p> <p> </p> <p><strong>How to cite this article: </strong></p> <p>Sağlıklı A, İpek F. Evaluation of the buccal bone thickness in the anterior maxillary region using cone-beam computed tomography. Int Dent Res 2023;13(S1):1-10. <a href="https://doi.org/10.5577/idr.2023.vol13.s1.1">https://doi.org/10.5577/idr.2023.vol13.s1.1</a></p> <p> </p> <p><strong>Linguistic Revision:</strong> The English in this manuscript has been checked by at least two professional editors, both native speakers of English.</p> 2023-10-15T00:00:00+00:00 Copyright (c) 2023 International Dental Research https://www.dental-research.com/idr/article/view/489 Evaluation of the alveolar bone and lingual concavity in the posterior mandibular region based on cone-beam computed tomography data 2023-05-29T04:10:57+00:00 Garip Dala garipdala@gmail.com Fikret İpek melihsemih21@hotmail.com <p><strong>Aim: </strong>The objective of this study is to evaluate the morphology of the alveolar bone in the posterior mandibular region and its relationship with age and sex.</p> <p><strong>Methodology:</strong> In the present study, the reports of 500 patients over 18 years of age who were admitted to our faculty with an existing second premolar and missing first molar and who underwent cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) imaging were randomly selected and retrospectively evaluated. In the study, alveolar crest types, the buccolingual width of the alveolar crest, crest height, lingual concavity depth, and lingual concavity angle were measured.</p> <p><strong>Results:</strong> U-type crest was detected in 47.8% of 500 individuals evaluated using CBCT. The mean depth of the lingual concavities was 2.36 ± 1.11 mm, and the mean angle of the lingual concavities was 61.09 ± 11.33°. No statistically significant relationship was found between age and alveolar crest width, alveolar crest height, lingual concavity depth, and lingual concavity angle. No significant difference was found between genders in terms of lingual concavity depth, whereas alveolar crest width, alveolar crest height, and lingual concavity angle were significantly higher in males.</p> <p><strong>Conclusion:</strong> The alveolar crest height, alveolar crest width, and lingual concavity angle of edentulous crests in the mandibular first molar region were statistically significantly higher in males compared with females. It can be beneficial to evaluate gender-related differences using CBCT to prevent complications before performing implantation and other oral surgical procedures in the related region.</p> <p> </p> <p><strong>How to cite this article: </strong></p> <p>Dala A, İpek F. Evaluation of the alveolar bone and lingual concavity in the posterior mandibular region based on cone-beam computed tomography data. Int Dent Res 2023;13(S1):11-19. <a href="https://doi.org/10.5577/idr.2023.vol13.s1.2">https://doi.org/10.5577/idr.2023.vol13.s1.2</a></p> <p> </p> <p><strong>Linguistic Revision:</strong> The English in this manuscript has been checked by at least two professional editors, both native speakers of English.</p> 2023-10-15T00:00:00+00:00 Copyright (c) 2023 International Dental Research https://www.dental-research.com/idr/article/view/498 Performance of two different electronic apex locators during the removal of calcium silicate-based sealers 2023-08-13T15:27:33+00:00 Pelin Andaç Göçer pelingocer@gmail.com Parla Meva Durmazpınar parlamewa@hotmail.com Fatima Betül Baştürk dtfatima@gmail.com <p><strong>Aim: </strong>The aim of this in vitro study is to evaluate the accuracy of Root ZX and Propex Pixi during the retreatment of root canals obturated with different calcium silicate-based root canal sealers.</p> <p><strong>Methodology:</strong> Root canals of ninety human premolar teeth were shaped with ProTaper universal rotary files up to size F2 under 5.25% NaOCl irrigation for the present study. Root canal filling was carried out by lateral condensation technique using with gutta-percha and sealers; MTA Fillapex, CeraSeal or AH Plus. After seven days, the obturating materials were removed using D-Race files. While actual working length was recorded by direct observation, electronic working lengths were determined by Propex Pixi or Root ZX for tolerance limits of 0.5 mm and 1.0 mm. Data were analyzed using Shapiro Wilk, Mann-Whitney U, and Kruskal-Wallis tests (<em>p</em> &lt; 0.05).</p> <p><strong>Results:</strong> The performance of Propex Pixi and Root ZX was found to be statistically similar and did not differ on the root canals filled with different root canal sealers (<em>p</em> &lt; 0.05). Propex Pixi and Root ZX demonstrated more accurate measurements in the range of ±1 mm compared to ±0.5 mm in all groups, regardless of the type of root canal sealer used when filling the root canals before retreatment (<em>p</em> &lt; 0.05).</p> <p><strong>Conclusion:</strong> Root ZX and Propex Pixi can be used confidently in the retreatment of the root canals in which CeraSeal, MTA Fillapex, and AH Plus are used as sealers.</p> <p> </p> <p><strong>How to cite this article: </strong></p> <p>Göçer PA, Durmazpınar PM, Baştürk FB. Performance of two different electronic apex locators during the removal of calcium silicate-based sealers. Int Dent Res 2023;13(S1):20-25. <a href="https://doi.org/10.5577/idr.2023.vol13.s1.3">https://doi.org/10.5577/idr.2023.vol13.s1.3</a></p> <p> </p> <p><strong>Linguistic Revision:</strong> The English in this manuscript has been checked by at least two professional editors, both native speakers of English.</p> 2023-10-15T00:00:00+00:00 Copyright (c) 2023 International Dental Research https://www.dental-research.com/idr/article/view/506 Comparison of ProTaper Ultimate, TruNatomy, and Rotate rotary files in apical debris extrusion 2023-09-28T13:16:23+00:00 Mehmet Eskibağlar meskibaglar@firat.edu.tr Merve Yeniçeri Özata merveyeniceri05@hotmail.com Lucia lacobina Timis t.lucia@yahoo.com <p><strong>Aim: </strong>The aim of this study is to evaluate the amount of debris extruded apically by the primary shaping files of three rotary file systems manufactured with different alloy technologies [TruNatomy (TRN), ProTaper Ultimate (PTUltimate), and VDW.Rotate (VDW.R) files].</p> <p><strong>Methodology:</strong> Thirty lower premolar teeth with moderate curvature (10-20°) were randomly divided into three equal groups (n=10) according to three rotary file systems [TRN (26.04v), PTUltimate (25.08v), and VDW.R (25.06v)]. The debris extruded apically was collected in Eppendorf tubes of known weights. After preparation, the tubes were placed in an incubator at 70°C for five days to evaporate the distilled water. The tubes filled with debris were then weighed again, and the net weight of the extruded debris was calculated in grams (g) by subtracting the initial weight from the final weight. The data were analyzed using one-way ANOVA test.</p> <p><strong>Results:</strong> There was no significant difference in the amount of debris extruded apically by the three shaping files (<em>p</em> &gt; 0.05). The highest amount of debris extruded apically was 0.9534 g for PTUltimate. VDW.R extruded the minimum amount of debris apically, with 0.1833 g.</p> <p><strong>Conclusion:</strong> All rotary files have caused apical debris extrusion. Even though there was no significant difference among the files, the VDW.R file extruded less debris compared to other file systems.</p> <p> </p> <p><strong>How to cite this article: </strong></p> <p>Eskibağlar M, Yeniçeri Özata M, Timis Ll. Comparison of ProTaper Ultimate, TruNatomy, and Rotate rotary files in apical debris extrusion. Int Dent Res 2023;13(S1):26-31. <a href="https://doi.org/10.5577/idr.2023.vol13.s1.4">https://doi.org/10.5577/idr.2023.vol13.s1.4</a></p> <p> </p> <p><strong>Linguistic Revision:</strong> The English in this manuscript has been checked by at least two professional editors, both native speakers of English.</p> 2023-10-15T00:00:00+00:00 Copyright (c) 2023 International Dental Research https://www.dental-research.com/idr/article/view/503 Evaluating the accuracy of intraoral scanners used in single-unit implant prosthesis construction 2023-09-15T09:01:24+00:00 Elifnur Güzelce Sultanoğlu elifnurguzelce@gmail.com Büşra Keleş Eroğlu bsrkeles@gmail.com <p><strong>Aim: </strong>This study aims to evaluate and compare the scanning accuracy of various intraoral scanners when taking digital impressions of single-implant-supported prostheses.</p> <p><strong>Methodology:</strong> A partially edentulous model with a single implant was produced, and a scan body was fixed on the model. The control model was created by scanning the model using Ineos X5 (CM). The model was also scanned (n = 3) using three different intraoral scanners (IOS) [(Helios (H), TRIOS 3 (T3), Medit (M)]. GOM Inspect software was used for comparison. The data were analyzed with a Shapiro–Wilk test, resulting in a nonnormal distribution, and Kruskal–Wallis test was employed for intergroup parameter comparisons.</p> <p><strong>Results:</strong> There were significant differences in the devices’ accuracy values (<em>p</em> &lt; 0.05). Accuracy M (19.1 μm), T3 (25.3 μm), H (33.9 μm) and sensitivity values (M (10 μm), T3 (19.05 μm), H (25 μm)) are similarly listed from high to low as M, T3, and H.</p> <p><strong>Conclusion:</strong> IOS can be used to create digital impressions for single-unit implant crowns. Clinicians should be cautious and selective when choosing IOS for more successful and accurate impressions. More comprehensive and clinical studies using different brands are needed on this subject.</p> <p> </p> <p><strong>How to cite this article: </strong></p> <p>Güzelce Sultanoğlu E, Keleş Eroğlu B. Evaluating the accuracy of intraoral scanners used in single-unit implant prosthesis construction. Int Dent Res 2023;13(S1):32-37. <a href="https://doi.org/10.5577/idr.2023.vol13.s1.5">https://doi.org/10.5577/idr.2023.vol13.s1.5</a></p> <p> </p> <p><strong>Linguistic Revision:</strong> The English in this manuscript has been checked by at least two professional editors, both native speakers of English.</p> 2023-10-15T00:00:00+00:00 Copyright (c) 2023 International Dental Research https://www.dental-research.com/idr/article/view/501 Evaluation of the effect of class II fixed orthodontic treatment on the periradicular bone structure of endodontically treated mandibular molar teeth using fractal dimension analysis 2023-08-31T16:28:16+00:00 Ebru Küçükkaraca dr.ebrukucukkaraca@gmail.com Esma Sarıçam as@as.com <p><strong>Aim: </strong>The aim of this study was to investigate whether changes in periradicular tissues with orthodontic movement of root canal-treated teeth differ from those without root canal treatment using fractal dimension analysis (FA).</p> <p><strong>Methodology:</strong> A retrospective archive study was performed using panoramic radiographs taken before (T1) and after (T2) fixed orthodontic treatment. Panoramic radiographs of a total of 32 mandibular 1st and 2nd molar teeth were divided into groups: Group 1 (n:17), the control group, comprised radiographs of mandibular 1st or 2nd teeth without root canal treatment, and Group 2 (n:15) comprised radiographs of 1st or 2nd mandibular molars with root canal treatment. Fractal analyses were performed in four different regions—the periapical, bifurcation, mesial periapical, and distal periapical regions—of the mandibular molar teeth included in the study for a total of 128 analyses.</p> <p><strong>Results:</strong> In the control group, orthodontic treatment did not make a statistically significant difference to the fractal dimension values in the four regions of the tooth (<em>p</em> &gt; 0.05). In the endodontically treated group, the fractal dimension values of the mesial periapical regions increased statistically significantly after orthodontic treatment (<em>p</em> &lt; 0.05).</p> <p><strong>Conclusion:</strong> The FA values of this study showed that more biological interaction occurred in the root canal treatment group and in the mesial periapical region. Thus, it is important to keep orthodontic force within the tooth’s physiological limits to avoid damaging the tooth in the periapical areas where stress accumulates during orthodontic treatment.</p> <p> </p> <p><strong>How to cite this article: </strong></p> <p>Küçükkaraca E, Sarıçam E. Evaluation of the effect of class II fixed orthodontic treatment on the periradicular bone structure of endodontically treated mandibular molar teeth using fractal dimension analysis. Int Dent Res 2023;13(S1):38-43. <a href="https://doi.org/10.5577/idr.2023.vol13.s1.6">https://doi.org/10.5577/idr.2023.vol13.s1.6</a></p> <p> </p> <p><strong>Linguistic Revision:</strong> The English in this manuscript has been checked by at least two professional editors, both native speakers of English.</p> 2023-10-15T00:00:00+00:00 Copyright (c) 2023 International Dental Research https://www.dental-research.com/idr/article/view/505 Analyzing biomimetic dentistry YouTube videos' quality and content 2023-09-18T12:32:55+00:00 Yelda Erdem Hepşenoğlu yelda_erdem89@hotmail.com Duygu Değirmencioğlu duygudegirmencioglu@gmail.com Celalettin Topbaş dt.c.topbas@gmail.com <p><strong>Aim: </strong>This study evaluated the quality and content of YouTube videos about biomimetic dentistry.</p> <p><strong>Methodology:</strong> A keyword search for "biomimetic dentistry" was conducted on YouTube. It used only publicly available Internet data from searching YouTube with the default filter “Biomimetic Dentistry” on April 3, 2023. Of the 200 examined videos, only 91 fit the inclusion criteria; those 91 videos underwent a content quality evaluation. The videos' viewing rates were determined after their demographic characteristics were assessed. The information quality index (VIQI) and the Global Quality Scale (GQS) were used to evaluate the video quality. For the statistical analysis, the Shapiro–Wilk, Kruskal–Wallis, Mann–Whitney U, Chi-square, and Fisher's exact tests were used.</p> <p><strong>Results:</strong> Most of the videos (n = 59) were labeled "low content," and healthcare practitioners uploaded the majority (91.2%) of them to YouTube. The most discussed subject was advantages and disadvantages (87.9%), followed by the definition of biomimetic dentistry (76.9%). The high-content video group's GQS and VIQI scores were significantly higher than low-content group. There was a statistically significant positive correlation between the VIQI and GQS (<em>p</em> &lt; 0.05) (<em>p</em> = 0,001) and a positive correlation between the overall content, total VIQI, and total GQS scores.</p> <p><strong>Conclusion:</strong> The material in YouTube videos about biomimetic dentistry is insufficient for use as a patient information tool. Biomimetic dentistry-related YouTube videos' quality and content were typically poor. Health practitioners should be aware of the content of video-sharing platforms and take responsibility for enriching video content.</p> <p> </p> <p><strong>How to cite this article: </strong></p> <p>Erdem Hepşenoğlu Y, Değirmencioğlu D, Topbaş C. Analyzing biomimetic dentistry YouTube videos' quality and content. Int Dent Res 2023;13(S1):44-49. <a href="https://doi.org/10.5577/idr.2023.vol13.s1.7">https://doi.org/10.5577/idr.2023.vol13.s1.7</a></p> <p> </p> <p><strong>Linguistic Revision:</strong> The English in this manuscript has been checked by at least two professional editors, both native speakers of English.</p> 2023-10-15T00:00:00+00:00 Copyright (c) 2023 International Dental Research