https://www.dental-research.com/index.php/idr/issue/feed International Dental Research 2021-05-08T06:13:33+00:00 Prof. Dr. Ozkan ADIGUZEL info@dental-research.com Open Journal Systems <p align="justify"><em>International Dental Research </em>is a multidisciplinary&nbsp;double-blind peer-reviewed dental journal publishing articles in the field of dentistry. The <em>International Dental Research</em> is the official tri-annually publication (April, August, December).&nbsp;</p> <p align="justify">The <em>&nbsp;International Dental Research</em> publishes scientific articles, case reports and comparison studies evaluating materials and methods of dental treatment. Dentists can learn about new concepts in dental treatment and the latest advances in techniques and instrumentation in the one journal that helps them keep pace with rapid changes in this field. The journal also aims to provide clinicians, scientists and students of dentistry with a knowledge transfer platform for rapid publication of reports through an international journal, which will be available free online. The broad coverage of current research has given the journal an international reputation as an indispensable source for both basic scientists and clinicians engaged in understanding and preventing dental disease. All articles will be critically reviewed by the editor and invited referees within 2 months. No fees are requested from the authors for submission and publication process.</p> https://www.dental-research.com/index.php/idr/article/view/201 Antibacterial and antifungal activity of an MTA-Based root canal sealer versus epoxy resin-based and methacrylate resin-based sealers 2021-01-17T21:54:45+00:00 Ali Türkyılmaz turkyilmaz_a@hotmail.com Ali Erdemir erdemirali@hotmail.com <p><strong>Aim:</strong> The purpose of this study was to compare the antibacterial and antifungal activity of MTA Fillapex with AH 26, AH Plus, and RealSeal root canal sealers. <em>S. aureus</em>, <em>E. faecalis</em>, and <em>C. albicans</em> were used as test microorganisms with the agar-diffusion test (ADT) and the direct contact test (DCT). &nbsp;</p> <p><strong>Methodology: </strong>For the ADT, 48 Mueller-Hinton plates were divided into 3 groups according to the microorganism used. Each group was then divided into 4 subgroups according to root canal sealer. Mueller-Hinton and Sabouraud agar mediums were preferred, and inhibition zones were measured to determine the antimicrobial efficacy at designated intervals. In the DCT, 96-well microtiter plates were used. For each microorganism and each sealer, 8 consecutive wells were prepared vertically on the plate. Microbial suspensions were allowed to directly contact the sealers in each well for 1 hour at 37°C. Subsequently, microbial growth was spectrophotometrically measured at set intervals for the freshly mixed and set forms.</p> <p><strong>Results: </strong>A statistically significant difference was found between the tested root canal sealers for antimicrobial effectiveness (p &lt; 0.05). According to the ADT results, all sealers had antimicrobial activity against the tested microorganisms. MTA Fillapex demonstrated satisfying results in the ADT against all microorganisms. In the DCT, MTA Fillapex inhibited bacterial and fungal growth in all freshly mixed and set forms. However, the set forms of AH 26 and AH Plus began to lose their antimicrobial activity on the tested microorganisms after a while.</p> <p><strong>Conclusion:</strong> The results showed that the MTA-based root canal sealer MTA Fillapex may be a favorable alternative sealer against bacterial and/or fungal species in clinical practice.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>How to cite this article:</strong></p> <p>Türkyılmaz A, Erdemir A. Antibacterial and antifungal activity of MTA-based root canal sealer versus epoxy resin-based and methacrylate resin-based sealers. Int Dent Res 2020;10(3):66-72.&nbsp;</p> <p><a href="https://doi.org/10.5577/intdentres.2020.vol10.no3.1">https://doi.org/10.5577/intdentres.2020.vol10.no3.1</a></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>Linguistic Revision:</strong>&nbsp;The English in this manuscript has been checked by at least two professional editors, both native speakers of English.</p> 2020-12-31T00:00:00+00:00 ##submission.copyrightStatement## https://www.dental-research.com/index.php/idr/article/view/242 Investigation of microleakage of polymerized with LED and halogen light devices four different restorative materials 2021-01-17T21:54:44+00:00 Ayşe Günay ayok18@hotmail.com Emin Caner Tümen ect1976@gmail.com <p><strong>Aim: </strong>This study aimed to evaluate the in vitro effects on microleakage of LED and halogen light devices used in the polymerization of monomer structure composite resins of different viscosities and inorganic filling particle size applied to standard class V cavities in primary teeth.</p> <p><strong>Methodology:</strong> 80 non caries primary molar teeth with standard class v cavity on the buccal surfaces were used. The teeth were randomly divided into 4 main groups and restored with composite resins (Herculite® XRV, Ultra™, Filtek™ Silorane, Vertise™ Flow, Æliteflo™). Each group was divided into 2 sub-groups for polymerization with LED or halogen light devices. Following the thermal cycle and subsequent procedures, the dye penetration method was used to evaluate microleakage. The microleakage scores were evaluated using the Kruskal-Wallis and Mann-Whitney U-tests.</p> <p><strong>Results:</strong> According to the results of the statistical analysis, in polymerization made with halogen and LED light devices at the occlusal edge, the microleakage scores from lowest to highest were as follows: Filtek™ Silorane &lt; Herculite® XRV Ultra™ &lt; Æliteflo™ &lt; Vertise™ Flow. In polymerization made with halogen and LED light devices at the gingival edge, the microleakage scores from lowest to highest were as follows: Filtek™ Silorane &lt; Herculite® XRV Ultr™ &lt; Vertise™ Flow &lt; Æliteflo™.</p> <p><strong>Conclusion:</strong> In the polymerizations made by using LED and halogen light devices, Herculite® XRV Ultra™, was found to be successful as it showed similar values to Filtek™ Silorane, which gave the best results in terms of microleakage. Moreover, as we have reached similar findings in our thesis study in respect of microleakage, in cases indicating the use of flow composite resin materials such as Æliteflo™, Vertise™ Flow can be used as it has the advantage of ease application and thus provide an ideal alternative in pediatric dentistry.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>How to cite this article:</strong></p> <p>Günay A, Tümen EC. Investigation of microleakage of polymerized with LED and halogen light devices four different restorative materials. Int Dent Res 2020;10(3):73-9. <a href="https://doi.org/10.5577/intdentres.2020.vol10.no3.2">https://doi.org/10.5577/intdentres.2020.vol10.no3.2</a></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>Linguistic Revision:</strong>&nbsp;The English in this manuscript has been checked by at least two professional editors, both native speakers of English.</p> 2020-12-31T00:00:00+00:00 ##submission.copyrightStatement## https://www.dental-research.com/index.php/idr/article/view/245 Assessment of the acid resistance behaviour of dentin tubules occluded by different desensitizers 2021-01-17T21:54:44+00:00 Fatih Karayürek fatihkarayurek@karatekin.edu.tr Osman Fatih Arpağ ofarpag@hotmail.com <p><strong>Aim:</strong> To evaluate the efficacy of in-office and home-based products in the prevention of dentinal hypersensitivity on dentin discs.</p> <p><strong>Methodology:</strong> Ninety-six dentin disc samples of 1 mm were divided equally into six groups as follows: TeethmateTM, Smartprotect®, novamin®, Arginine calcium carbonate, potassium oxalate with rinse and saline (control). After acid etching, test agents were applied, and eight samples in each group were subjected to citric acid. SEM examination (3000x) and statistical analysis were carried out.</p> <p><strong>Results:</strong> Before citric acid challenge, novamin® and teethmate had superiority when compared to others (p&lt;0.001), but there was no a statistical difference between novamin® and teethmate. After citric acid challenge, teethmate and smartprotect showed resistance on occluded tubules. The decreasing in the level of occluded tubules in novamin® group was statistically significant (p&lt;0.05). In-office products including teethmate and smartprotect were found more successful compared to home-based products. Smartprotect resisted against to citric acid (0.506).</p> <p><strong>Conclusion:</strong> Novamin® showed a successful occlusion in all tubules before acid challenge whereas; it was the most unsuccessful group after acid challenge when compared to other agents. In-office agents were found to be more successful in reducing dentine permeability than home-care products. In-office agents showed more resistance to acid attacks. Further studies are needed to assess the efficacy of desensitizer agents.</p> <p><strong>How to cite this article:</strong></p> <p>Karayürek F, Arpağ OF. Assessment of the acid resistance behaviour of dentin tubules occluded by different desensitizers. Int Dent Res 2020;10(3):80-9.&nbsp; <a href="https://doi.org/10.5577/intdentres.2020.vol10.no3.3">https://doi.org/10.5577/intdentres.2020.vol10.no3.3</a></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>Linguistic Revision:</strong>&nbsp;The English in this manuscript has been checked by at least two professional editors, both native speakers of English.</p> 2020-12-31T00:00:00+00:00 ##submission.copyrightStatement## https://www.dental-research.com/index.php/idr/article/view/270 The effects of periapical lesion healing on bone density 2021-05-08T06:13:33+00:00 Gizem Akın Tartuk gzmmakin@gmail.com Elçin Tekin Bulut atb@atb.com <p>Operative dental procedures may promote pulpal infections, such as tooth cavity, trauma and teeth abrasion, anaerobic microorganism colonization causing total pulp necrosis, and periapical lesions that result in bone destruction in the periapical region. Periapical radiographs are important tools for identifying periapical pathologies. However, given that the imaging system shows three-dimensional formations in two dimensions, the knowledge about the actual size of the lesion and the real relationship with the anatomic structures is limited. These limitations force clinicians to choose the high resolution and current imaging methods that show all the details of the oral structures, such as conic beam computed tomography (CBCT). CBCT is a highly effective diagnostic device for early period bone lesion detection in which the gray value for bone density is measured in Hounsfield unit (HU). Other than using CBCT, bone mineral density measurement can be done to assess the healing of existing lesions. When the periapical lesion is healing, a series of formation and destruction processes follow each other. On the one hand, mediators and tissues that must be removed from the region are destroyed by host defense cells; on the other hand, cells included in the repair process provide new tissue generation and remodelling to provide the pre-disease anatomic properties in the lesion region. This review discusses recent studies using current three-dimensional imaging methods, compared with traditional methods for bone damage due to periapical lesion formation and healing after suitable treatment. This study aims to investigate the advantages and shortcomings of existing treatment and diagnosis approaches in endodontic periradicular lesion diagnosis and treatment. The findings highlight promising diagnosis and treatment tools and suggest the expansion of minimally invasive approaches to eliminate the problems in periapical lesions.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>How to cite this article:</strong> Akın Tartuk G, Tekin Bulut E. The effects of periapical lesion healing on bone density. Int Dent Res 2020;10(3):90-9.&nbsp;<a href="https://doi.org/10.5577/intdentres.2020.vol10.no3.5">https://doi.org/10.5577/intdentres.2020.vol10.no3.5</a></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>Linguistic Revision:</strong>&nbsp;The English in this manuscript has been checked by at least two professional editors, both native speakers of English.</p> 2020-12-31T00:00:00+00:00 ##submission.copyrightStatement## https://www.dental-research.com/index.php/idr/article/view/251 Novel coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) and challenges in dental practices 2021-01-19T18:55:39+00:00 Adalet Çelebi adalet_celebi@hotmail.com Ezgi Eroğlu Çakmakoğlu a@a.com <p>The Covid-19 virus appearing in Wuhan in December, 2019 and acting by binding to ACE-2 receptors in the respiratory system has caused many people to die by spreading to the whole world. The virus, which has been detected to spread faster than SARS-CoV and MERS-CoV viruses, spreads from person to person rapidly.&nbsp; People should not be together because it is transmitted from person to person through the respiratory tract.&nbsp; For this reason, it is recommended not to go to health institutions, provided that it is not urgent.&nbsp; However, many emergency patients go to dental clinics and hospitals for treatment. In this review; with possible contamination routes of Covid-19 such as airborne spread, contact spread and contaminated surface spread during patient diagnosis and treatment to prevent Covid-19 contamination, methods preventing spread such as hand hygiene, personal protective measures for dentists, intraoral rubber dam before dental procedures were indicated. It was also mentioned that the fast rotating tool with valves having negative pressure should be used and most importantly, the materials used in the dental clinic should be disposed in accordance with medical waste protocol.</p> <p><strong>How to cite this article:</strong></p> <p>Novel coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) and challenges in dental practices. Int Dent Res 2020;10(3):100-15. <a href="https://doi.org/10.5577/intdentres.2020.vol10.n3.5">https://doi.org/10.5577/intdentres.2020.vol10.n3.5</a></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>Linguistic Revision:</strong>&nbsp;The English in this manuscript has been checked by at least two professional editors, both native speakers of English.</p> 2020-12-31T00:00:00+00:00 ##submission.copyrightStatement##