https://www.dental-research.com/index.php/idr/issue/feed International Dental Research 2021-09-30T04:52:07+00:00 Prof. Dr. Ozkan ADIGUZEL info@dental-research.com Open Journal Systems <p align="justify"><em>International Dental Research </em>is a multidisciplinary&nbsp;double-blind peer-reviewed dental journal publishing articles in the field of dentistry. The <em>International Dental Research</em> is the official tri-annually publication (April, August, December).&nbsp;</p> <p align="justify">The <em>&nbsp;International Dental Research</em> publishes scientific articles, case reports and comparison studies evaluating materials and methods of dental treatment. Dentists can learn about new concepts in dental treatment and the latest advances in techniques and instrumentation in the one journal that helps them keep pace with rapid changes in this field. The journal also aims to provide clinicians, scientists and students of dentistry with a knowledge transfer platform for rapid publication of reports through an international journal, which will be available free online. The broad coverage of current research has given the journal an international reputation as an indispensable source for both basic scientists and clinicians engaged in understanding and preventing dental disease. All articles will be critically reviewed by the editor and invited referees within 2 months. No fees are requested from the authors for submission and publication process.</p> https://www.dental-research.com/index.php/idr/article/view/296 Comparison of two adhesive systems of various polyetheretherketone (PEEK) composites on the shear bond strength 2021-09-30T04:52:05+00:00 Fatih Demirci a@abcd.com Samet Tekin samet.tekin@ymail.com <p><strong>Aim:</strong> In this in vitro study, the effect of two adhesive systems applied to surfaces of different polyether-ether-ketone (PEEK) composites on the shear bond strength (SBS) of a composite resin was compared.</p> <p><strong>Methodology:</strong> Eighty PEEK specimens were divided into four groups (n=20): Unfilled PEEK (UF), carbon-fiber-reinforced PEEK (CFR), glass-fiber-reinforced PEEK (GFR), and ceramic-reinforced PEEK (CR). Each group was further divided into two subgroups (n=10):&nbsp;Visio.link (VL) and Single Bond Universal (SB). The specimens with 8-mm diameter and 5-mm thickness were prepared. SBS was examined using a universal testing machine. Results were statistically analyzed by multivariate analysis of variance and Tukey’s post-hoc test. Failure modes were analyzed using a stereomicroscope at 20× magnification. Surface properties were examined by scanning electron microscopy. The surface properties of the specimens were examined by scanning electron microscopy (SEM).&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>Results:</strong> Effect of different PEEK and adhesive systems on SBS was found to be statistically significant (p&lt;0.05). SBS values for CFR-VL and UF-VL groups were statistically more significant than those for CFR-SB and UF-SB groups (p=0.001). SBS values for the GFR-VL group were statistically more significant than that for the UF-VL group (p=0.001). SBS values for the CF-SB group were statistically more significant than those for CFR-SB and CFR-SB groups (p=0.001). Failure modes were examined using a stereomicroscope at 20× magnification, and adhesive and mixed failure modes were observed.</p> <p><strong>Conclusion:</strong> PEEK composites with different contents and properties can be used in fixed prosthetic restorations. However, additional experimental and clinical studies are required to investigate different PEEK frameworks and composite veneers.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>How to cite this article:</strong> Demirci F, Tekin S. Comparison of two adhesive systems of various polyetheretherketone (PEEK) composites on the shear bond strength. Int Dent Res 2021;11(2):54-61. <a href="https://doi.org/10.5577/intdentres.2021.vol11.no2.1">https://doi.org/10.5577/intdentres.2021.vol11.no2.1</a></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>Linguistic Revision:</strong>&nbsp;The English in this manuscript has been checked by at least two professional editors, both native speakers of English.</p> 2021-08-31T00:00:00+00:00 ##submission.copyrightStatement## https://www.dental-research.com/index.php/idr/article/view/271 Perception of pain during initial fixed orthodontic treatment 2021-09-30T04:52:05+00:00 Refika Topal refikatopal@hotmail.com <p><strong>Aim:</strong> The present study aims to evaluate the pain experienced by individuals during the first days of fixed orthodontic treatment.</p> <p><strong>Methodology:</strong> One hundred and twenty patients (65 female; mean age: 18 ± 21 years) were given fixed orthodontic treatment, including the placement of a 0.014 Ni-Ti conventional arch wire (American Orthodontics, Sheboygan, Wisconsin, USA) after the bonding procedure with maxillary and mandibular rear 0.022” slot Roth brackets (Mini Master Series, American Orthodontics, Sheboygan, Wisconsin, USA). A visual analog scale (VAS) was used to assess the level of pain the patients experienced on the first, second, and seventh days of the treatment. The mean VAS scores of the male and female patients were compared using the student’s t-test, ANOVA, and the chi-square test.</p> <p><strong>Results:</strong> Males were found to have higher mean VAS scores on the first and second days of the treatment compared to the females (p = 0.001 and p = 0.038, respectively). A greater proportion of the patients (33.33%) experienced pain on the first day of the treatment compared to the second and seventh days (p &lt;0.05).</p> <p><strong>Conclusion:</strong> It was determined that the patients experienced the highest level of pain on the first day of fixed orthodontic treatment. The male patients experienced a higher level of pain than the females on the first and second days of the treatment.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>How to cite this article:</strong> Topal R. Perception of pain during initial fixed orthodontic treatment. Int Dent Res 2021;11(2):62-6. <a href="https://doi.org/10.5577/intdentres.2021.vol11.no2.2">https://doi.org/10.5577/intdentres.2021.vol11.no2.2</a></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>Linguistic Revision:</strong>&nbsp;The English in this manuscript has been checked by at least two professional editors, both native speakers of English.</p> 2021-08-31T00:00:00+00:00 ##submission.copyrightStatement## https://www.dental-research.com/index.php/idr/article/view/322 Orthodontic brackets’ shear bond strengths after applying remineralizing agents 2021-09-30T04:52:05+00:00 Yusuf Özant abc@abc.com Yazgı Ay Ünüvar yazgiay@hotmail.com <p><strong>Aim:</strong> The aim of this in vitro study was to measure the effects of white spot lesions treatment agents on the shear bond strengths (SBSs) and adhesive residual indexes (ARIs) of orthodontic brackets.</p> <p><strong>Methodology:</strong> This study used 100 human premolar teeth randomly divided into five groups. Group 1 comprised those with intact enamel, Group 2 comprised those with demineralized enamel and Groups 3–5 comprised those demineralized enamel that was treated with casein phosphopeptide amorphous calcium phosphate fluoride (CPP-ACPF), fluoride varnish and a resin infiltrant, respectively. Brackets were bonded to the teeth using the conventional method, then the samples were thermocycled and tested for SBS using a universal&nbsp;testing machine. The adhesive remnant indexes (ARI) of the brackets were also evaluated. One-way ANOVA and post-hoc Tukey tests were used to compare the groups’ SBSs and the Kruskal–Wallis test was used to evaluate the groups’ ARI scores. Results were considered statistically significant if p was less than 0.05.</p> <p><strong>Results:</strong> Statistically significant differences were found between the groups (F was 6.895 and p was less than 0.001). The SBSs of the brackets in Group 4 were significantly lower than those of the other groups (the mean was 13.44 ± 6.37 MPa). Group 5 had the highest mean SBS value (22.11 ± 6.56 MPa). Additionally, the ARI scores of the four groups were significantly different (p was less than 0.001).</p> <p><strong>Conclusion:</strong> Resin infiltration and CPP-ACPF applications can improve bonds to demineralized enamel, while fluoride varnish applications are not recommended for such enamel.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>How to cite this article:&nbsp;</strong>Özant Y, Ay Ünüvar Y. Orthodontic brackets’ shear bond strengths after applying remineralizing agents. Int Dent Res 2021;11(2):67-74. <a href="https://doi.org/10.5577/intdentres.2021.vol11.no2.3">https://doi.org/10.5577/intdentres.2021.vol11.no2.3</a></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>Linguistic Revision:</strong>&nbsp;The English in this manuscript has been checked by at least two professional editors, both native speakers of English.</p> 2021-08-31T00:00:00+00:00 ##submission.copyrightStatement## https://www.dental-research.com/index.php/idr/article/view/299 A micro-computed tomography evaluation of the change in volume of different bulk-fill composite materials caused by polymerization shrinkage 2021-09-30T04:52:05+00:00 Suzan Cangül suzanbali@outlook.com Özkan Adıgüzel suzanbali@outlook.com Savaş Sağmak dr.savas@hotmail.com Begüm Evran begumerpacal@gmail.com <p><strong>Aim:</strong> Composite resins contain different monomers and fillers that are directly affected by polymerization shrinkage.&nbsp; Therefore, an accurate and reliable method is needed to measure the volume changes. The aim of this study was to evaluate the amount of volume change associated with polymerization shrinkage in four different bulk-fill composite materials in class II restorations using a micro-CT device, which has high resolution and provides 3-dimensional images.</p> <p><strong>Methodology:</strong> A total of 40 human 3rd molar teeth were used. First, standard class II cavities were opened on the mesial surfaces of all the teeth, and then the first micro-CT images were obtained. The same adhesive material was applied to all the teeth. The teeth were then separated into four groups, and a different bulk-fill composite was applied to each group; Filtek (FTK), X-tra Fil (XTF), Tetric Evo Ceram (TEC), and Filtek One (FLO) and the second micro-CT images were obtained. Then after polymerization of the materials, the final micro-CT images were taken, and analyses were made according to the scanning results. The Kruskal Wallis and Mann Whitney U-tests were used in the statistical evaluation of the data.&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>Results:</strong> The volumetric gap formed after polymerization of the composite resins was not determined to be statistically significant (p&gt;0.05).</p> <p><strong>Conclusion:</strong> The volumetric difference (%) between the composite resin and the dental tissue following polymerization was seen to be greatest in XTF and least in FTK. It was concluded that the volumetric gap caused by the polymerization shrinkage of the tested materials may be due to the structure of the material.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>How to cite this article:</strong> Cangül S, Adıgüzel Ö, Sağmak S, Evran B. A micro-computed tomography evaluation of the change in volume of different bulk-fill composite materials caused by polymerization shrinkage. Int Dent Res 2021;11(2):75-82. <a href="https://doi.org/10.5577/intdentres.2021.vol11.no2.4">https://doi.org/10.5577/intdentres.2021.vol11.no2.4</a></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>Linguistic Revision:</strong>&nbsp;The English in this manuscript has been checked by at least two professional editors, both native speakers of English.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> 2021-08-31T00:00:00+00:00 ##submission.copyrightStatement## https://www.dental-research.com/index.php/idr/article/view/213 The evaluation of effectiveness of adhesive systems on dental amalgam restorations 2021-09-30T04:52:06+00:00 Mehmet Ünal dtmehmetunal@gmail.com Fatma Atakul abc@abcd.com <p><strong>Aim:</strong> The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of different adhesive systems in amalgam restorations and their effects on microleakage.</p> <p><strong>Methodology:</strong> In this study, 105 caries-free extracted human permanent molar teeth were used. Teeth were randomly assigned to five groups (n=21), and class I cavities were created on the surface of each tooth. The first was a control group to which no adhesive system was applied. Amalgam Liner (VOCO GmbH, Cuxhaven Germany) was applied to Group II, Clearfil SE-Bond (Kuraray Europe GmbH, Frankfurt Germany) was applied to Group III, Panavia F 2.0 (Kuraray Europe GmbH, Frankfurt Germany) was applied to Group IV, Amalgambond Plus (Parkell Inc.Edgewood, NY USA) was applied to Group V, and then amalgam (Tytin, Kerr, California USA) restorations were placed. After the polishing process, samples were subjected to thermocycling 1,000 times. Teeth were sectioned bucco-palatinally/lingually, and microleakage scores of the occlusal walls were evaluated under a stereomicroscope at 15X magnification by a standardized scale ranging from 0 to 4. One tooth was selected randomly from each group for SEM (Scanning Electron Microscope), and SEM LEO EVO 40 (LEO Ltd., Cambridge UK) photographs of amalgam-tooth hard tissue interfaces were also taken at different magnifications. The results of the microleakage tests were statistically analyzed by both the Kruskal-Wallis Test and the Mann Whitney U Test.</p> <p><strong>Results:</strong> In terms of microleakage among groups, the differences that were determined were significant (p&lt;0.05). Microleakage within the control group was determined to be the highest, and statistically important differences were observed between the other groups. Group V (Amalgambond Plus) was determined to have the lowest microleakage scores.</p> <p><strong>Conclusion:</strong> In prepared class I cavities, amalgam adhesive systems are effective in preventing occlusal microleakage but do not completely blocked it.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>How to cite this article:</strong> Ünal M, Atakul F. The evaluation of effectiveness of adhesive systems on dental amalgam restorations. Int Dent Res 2021;11(2):83-92. <a href="https://doi.org/10.5577/intdentres.2021.vol11.no2.5">https://doi.org/10.5577/intdentres.2021.vol11.no2.5</a></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>Linguistic Revision:</strong>&nbsp;The English in this manuscript has been checked by at least two professional editors, both native speakers of English.</p> 2021-08-31T00:00:00+00:00 ##submission.copyrightStatement## https://www.dental-research.com/index.php/idr/article/view/248 Is there a relation between dental calculus and kidney stone? 2021-09-30T04:52:06+00:00 Kadir Yıldırım taloyildirim@firat.edu.tr Tuba Talo Yıldırım dt_talo@hotmail.com Filiz Acun Kaya facunkaya@gmail.com <p><strong>Aim:</strong> The purpose of this research is to investigate the frequency of dental calculus in patients with kidney stone and without kidney stone.</p> <p><strong>Methodology:</strong> Two hundred eighty-seven patients (143 men and 144 women) aged between 18 and 68 (mean age 38.38±13.74) were included in the study. Patients were divied two groups in which 143 subjects without kidney stones (group I) and 144 subject with kidney stones (group II). Intra-group and inter-group analyzes were performed in terms of periodontal status and dental calculus index according to educational level, frequency of toothbrushing and smoking.&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>Results:</strong> The study sample consisted of 287 patients which 143 in group I, 144 in group II. The mean age of the group I was 36.77±12.81 years old, and group II was 39.98±14.47 years old. There was a statistically significant difference between periodontal status and education level, daily tooth brushing and smoking in group I and group II (p&lt;0.05). Both in group I and group II there was a statistically significant difference periodontal calculus index and education level, smoking, daily tooth brushing (p&lt;0.05). In addition, there were significant correlations between dental calculus index and size of the kidney stone.</p> <p><strong>Conclusion:</strong> There is a significant difference between the groups in terms of dental calculus index. There is a need for additional study on this subject in the future.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>How to cite this article:</strong> Yıldırım K, Acun Kaya F, Talo Yıldırım T. Is there a relation between dental calculus and kidney stone? Int Dent Res 2021;11(2):93-8. <a href="https://doi.org/10.5577/intdentres.2021.vol11.no2.6">https://doi.org/10.5577/intdentres.2021.vol11.no2.6</a></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>Linguistic Revision:</strong>&nbsp;The English in this manuscript has been checked by at least two professional editors, both native speakers of English.</p> 2021-08-31T00:00:00+00:00 ##submission.copyrightStatement## https://www.dental-research.com/index.php/idr/article/view/304 Transverse dentofacial dimensions according to skeletal maturation 2021-09-30T04:52:06+00:00 Türkan Sezen Erhamza dt.turkansezen@gmail.com Burçin Akan burcin.yksel@gmail.com Fatma Nazik Ünver dt.fatma.nazik@gmail.com Perihan Dalgalı Evli dt.pdalgali@gmail.com <p><strong>Aim:</strong> This study aimed to determine the dentofacial transverse dimensions according to the hand-wrist and cervical vertebrae skeletal maturation stages in order to evaluate the differences between the sexes, to identify the correlations between transverse measurements, and to compare the transverse measurements of individuals of different origins with those of Turkish individuals.</p> <p><strong>Methodology:</strong> Transverse measurements were performed using the posteroanterior radiographs of 265 Turkish individuals (150 females, 115 males) at 7–17 years of age. Skeletal maturation was evaluated using hand-wrist radiographs and lateral cephalometric radiographs, and the results were used to categorize the patients into 3 stages of hand-wrist skeletal maturity (prepubertal/pubertal/postpubertal) and 2 stages of cervical vertebrae maturity (prespurt/postspurt). Seven measurements were evaluated. A multivariate linear regression model was used to evaluate the correlations between transverse measurements and the variables of skeletal age and sex.</p> <p><strong>Results:</strong> Sex was a significant explanatory factor for all transverse variables. In the postpubertal and postspurt stages, all transverse measurement values were found to be higher in males. Postpubertal term was a significant explanatory factor for maxillary, mandibular, mandibular intermolar, and maxillary intermolar widths, whereas pubertal term was only a significant explanatory factor for maxillary intermolar width.</p> <p><strong>Conclusion:</strong> Skeletal age and sex should be taken into account when determining transverse dentofacial measurements.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>How to cite this article:</strong> Sezen Erhamza T, Akan B, Nazik Ünver F, Evli Dalgalı P. Transverse dentofacial dimensions according. Int Dent Res 2021;11(2):99-108. <a href="https://doi.org/10.5577/intdentres.2021.vol11.no2.7">https://doi.org/10.5577/intdentres.2021.vol11.no2.7</a></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>Linguistic Revision:</strong>&nbsp;The English in this manuscript has been checked by at least two professional editors, both native speakers of English.</p> 2021-08-31T00:00:00+00:00 ##submission.copyrightStatement## https://www.dental-research.com/index.php/idr/article/view/263 The effect of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder on children brushing habits, plaque index, and caries indices in children 2021-09-30T04:52:07+00:00 Berna Kuter berna.kuter@idu.edu.tr Burcu Kanmaz burcu.kanmaz@idu.edu.tr <p><strong>Aim:</strong> The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder on children's caries indices, plaque scores, and brushing habits in children aged 5-17 years.</p> <p><strong>Methodology:</strong> A total of 100 children (39 children with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder and 61 healthy children) were included in the study. The plaque index, decay-missed-filled primary tooth (dmf-t) index, and decay-missed-filled permanent tooth (DMF-T) index values were evaluated by clinical examination. The plaque was evaluated using the Silness and Loe Plaque Index. Patient forms were examined to evaluate brushing habits.</p> <p><strong>Results:</strong> When the survey data was examined, the number of healthy children who brushed their teeth was higher than that of children with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (p&lt;0.05). The dental visit and dental treatment rates were similar in both groups (p&gt;0.05). There was no significant difference between the two groups in terms of plaque index and dmf-t and DMF-T scores (p&gt;0.05).</p> <p><strong>Conclusion:</strong> Children with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder were observed to neglect oral care routines more than their healthy counterparts; however, this did not affect plaque and caries index values.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>How to cite this article:</strong> Kuter B, Kanmaz B. The effect of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder on children brushing habits, plaque index and caries indices in children. Int Dent Res 2021;11(2):109-13. <a href="https://doi.org/10.5577/intdentres.2021.vol11.no1.8">https://doi.org/10.5577/intdentres.2021.vol11.no1.8</a></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>Linguistic Revision:</strong>&nbsp;The English in this manuscript has been checked by at least two professional editors, both native speakers of English.</p> 2021-08-31T00:00:00+00:00 ##submission.copyrightStatement## https://www.dental-research.com/index.php/idr/article/view/317 Evaluating the masking ability of CAD/CAM hybrid ceramics with different thicknesses 2021-09-30T04:52:07+00:00 Beyza Ünalan Değirmenci beyzaunalan@hotmail.com Farhad Wahid Rasool farhadjaf85@gmail.com <p><strong>Aim:</strong> &nbsp;A discoloration existing under the restoration can affect the final restoration color, and various techniques can be used to address this situation. The aim of this study was to investigate the masking ability of the substructure, color of different hybrid CAD/CAM ceramics in various thicknesses.</p> <p><strong>Methodology: </strong>A total of 120 samples were produced from 4 different CAD/CAM hybrid ceramic blocks (Cerec blocs, GC Cerasmart, Vita Enamic, 3M Lava Ultimate) in 1, 1.5 and 2 mm thickness. The samples were sliced with 100 N pressure in a low-speed precision cutting device under water cooling. The specimens were placed over the neutral grey background for initial spectrophotometric measurements. A3 color posterior nanohybrid composite (14 X 7 X 1 mm) was preferred to mimic discoloration in the substructure. The cementation procedure of composite and the CAD/CAM hybrid ceramic complex was standardized under 10 N continuous pressure and was performed using a dual cured resin cement. All samples were incubated at 37 °C for 24 hours in incubator after cementation. And the second spectrophotometeric measurement was done via the L*, a*, and b* color attributes of the complex specimens. Additionally, ΔE* values were calculated to determine the color differences between each group. Kruskal Wallis test was used for statistical analysis and Dunn’s test was used for group comparison. Significance was evaluated at least p &lt;0.05.</p> <p><strong>Results: </strong>It was found that thickness of the ceramics increases, the substructure color is better masked and the thickness made a statistically significant difference on the masking ability (p&lt;0.01). For 1 mm thick samples, the highest ΔE* value was found in Cerec blocs with 9.36, while the lowest value was found in GC Cerasmart as 4.27.</p> <p><strong>Conclusion:</strong> Within the limitations of this study, it was concluded that the tested CAD/CAM hybrid ceramics showed better masking ability than Cerec blocs.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>How to cite this article:</strong> Ünalan Değirmenci B, Wahid WF. Evaluating the masking ability of CAD/CAM hybrid ceramics with different thicknesses. Int Dent Res 2021;11(2):114-20. <a href="https://doi.org/10.5577/intdentres.2021.vol11.no1.9">https://doi.org/10.5577/intdentres.2021.vol11.no1.9</a></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>Linguistic Revision:</strong>&nbsp;The English language in this manuscript has been checked by at least two professional editors, both native speakers of English.</p> 2021-08-31T00:00:00+00:00 ##submission.copyrightStatement## https://www.dental-research.com/index.php/idr/article/view/319 Effects of accelerated aging cycles on resin cement-glass ceramic bond strength 2021-09-30T04:52:07+00:00 Murat Eskitaşçıoğlu drdtmurat@yahoo.com.tr Rabia Bozbay rabiabozbay@icloud.com Beyza Ünalan Değirmenci beyzaunalan@hotmail.com <p><strong>Aim:</strong> A successful restoration is the result of the proper adhesion between dental tissue, cement and restoration material. The long-term durability of this bond is mandatory for clinical success. The aim of the present study is to investigate the influences of three different thermal cycle applications on resin cement-glass ceramic shear bond strength.</p> <p><strong>Methodology:</strong> In the present study, a single CAD/CAM glass ceramic block and five different resin cements (Panavia V5, RelyX U200, G-CEM LinkForce, RelyX Veneer,and Variolink Esthetic) were used. A total of 240 sections 2 mm in thickness were obtained under water cooling in a precision cutting machine with the aid of a diamond saw. Cementation of glass ceramic samples was conducted in accordance with the instructions of the manufacturer, and the cemented samples were incubated at 37 °C for 24 hours. Afterwards, samples were randomly divided into four groups according to thermal cycle: control group, 1750, 3500 and 7000 cycles (n = 12). Following aging procedures, the samples were tested for shear bond. Statistical analyses were done by using the IBM SPSS 20.0 program. While the ANOVA test was used for intra-group statistical analyses, LSD multi-comparison analysis was used for detection of the inter-group differences. Statistical significance was set at p &lt; 0.05.</p> <p><strong>Results:</strong> Although an overall reduction was seen in shear bond of all cement groups following thermal cycle applications, this reduction was found to be statistically significant for Panavia V5, RelyX Veneer and Variolink Esthetic (p&lt;0.05). Following 1750 cycles of thermal cycle application, Panavia V5 and G-Cem LinkForce with dual-cure property showed higher shear bond strength than RelyX Veneer and Variolink Esthetic with light-cure structure (p&lt;0.05).</p> <p><strong>Conclusion:</strong> The reduction in bond strength following the thermal cycle procedure is associated with water absorption in the resin cement-glass ceramic interface. So resin cement preferred for cementation of restorations is among the key parameters for clinical success.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>How to cite this article:</strong> Eskitaşçıoğlu M, Bozbay R, Ünalan Değirmenci B. Effects of accelerated aging cycles on resin cement-glass ceramic bond strength. Int Dent Res 2021;11(2):121-8. <a href="https://doi.org/10.5577/intdentres.2021.vol11.no2.10">https://doi.org/10.5577/intdentres.2021.vol11.no2.10</a></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>Linguistic Revision:</strong>&nbsp;The English in this manuscript has been checked by at least two professional editors, both native speakers of English.</p> 2021-08-31T00:00:00+00:00 ##submission.copyrightStatement##